Author Archives: Huenemann

About Huenemann

Curious about the ways humans use their minds and hearts to distract themselves from the meaninglessness of life.

What do an addictions nurse and a stand-up comedian have in common?

They both majored in philosophy at USU! On Thursday evening, 7 p.m., we’ll have the chance to meet with Eric Bottelberghe and Aaron Orlovitz, two philosophy majors who went on to careers not normally associated with philosophy. But both would say that philosophy is crucial to what they do.

Zoom link:  https://usu-edu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwsdeipqTktHtOZP8H2ynIFj-GAxswUo2tn

“Gamification and Value Capture” by Dr. Thi Nguyen, University of Utah

Thursday at 4!

To register: https://usu-edu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIsfuihrDksEtyH2OgFe9C-PJZCQudwofbK

Value capture occurs when an agent’s values are rich and subtle; they enter a social environment that presents simplified — typically quantified — versions of those values; and those simplified articulations come to dominate their practical reasoning. Examples include becoming motivated by FitBit’s step counts, Twitter Likes and Retweets, citation rates, ranked lists of best schools, and Grade Point Averages. We are vulnerable to value capture because of the competitive advantage that such crisp and clear expressions of value have in our private reasoning and our public justification. But value capture poses several threats. First, value capture threatens to change the goals of our activities, in a way that often threatens to undermine the value of those activities. Twitter’s scoring system threatens to replace some of the richer goals of communication — understanding, connection, and the mutual pursuit of truth — with the thinner goals of getting likes and going viral. (See also, citation rates and impact factors). Second, in value capture, we take a central component of our autonomy — our ongoing deliberation over the exact articulation of our values — and we outsource it. And the metrics to which we outsource usually engineered for the interests of some external force, like a large-scale institution’s interest in bureaucratic management. That outsourcing cuts off one of the key benefits to personal deliberation. In value capture, we no longer adjust our values and their articulations in light of own rich experience of the world. Our values should be carefully tailored to our particular selves, but in value capture, we buy our values off the rack.