Author Archives: Kleiner

About Kleiner

Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Utah State University. I teach across the curriculum, but am most interested in continental philosophy, ancient and medieval philosophy as well as Catholic thought, all of which might be summed up as an interest in the ressourcement tradition (returning in order to make progress). I also enjoy spending time thinking about liberal education and its ends.

Calling all medievalists!

The Logan Library is hosting a panel discussion with USU faculty on “Misconceptions of the Middle Ages”.  Friday, October 26, 4pm in the Jim Bridger room of the Logan City Library.  Click here for more information.

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Humanae Vitae documentary and discussion

This year is the 50th anniversary of one of the most significant and controversial encyclical letters of the last several hundred years – Humanae Vitae.  In that encyclical, Pope Paul VI reaffirmed Catholic teachings regarding marriage and family, most notably reaffirming the prohibition of any use of contraception.  The encyclical was, and remains, quite divisive within Catholic circles.  And given the large role the Catholic Church plays in social services and medical care, the encyclical has reverberated throughout the culture for the last 50 years.

The USU Catholic Newman Center is sponsoring a documentary film and discussion on the topic.  On Wednesday, Oct 3, from 6-8pm, we will watch “Unprotected: A Pope, the Pill, and the Perils of Sexual Chaos”.  Eccles Sciences Learning Center, room 053.  After the film, there will be a discussion time led by Dr Sherlock and Dr Kleiner.

All are welcome.

Undergrad Journal Opportunity

Of possible interest to USU PHIL majors:

CALL FOR EXTERNAL REVIEWERS

Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal seeks undergraduate philosophy students to serve as manuscript reviewers.

Stance reviewers hone their writing, researching, and analysis skills by evaluating original papers by some of the world’s most talented undergraduate scholars. Reviewers must have advanced undergraduate experience in philosophy, strengths in writing and editing, and the self-motivation necessary to complete work by given deadlines. A letter of recommendation from a professor who is familiar with the student’s philosophical abilities is required.

Stance has two types of manuscript reviewers. “External Reviewers” evaluate two or three manuscripts, typically in late January or early February. “Assistant Editorial Board Members” serve on our major review teams. Assistant Editorial Board Members consider approximately 20 -30 papers in December. All reviewers receive training material that explains what is expected in the formal review and are guided by an experienced Stance staff member. Reviewers are credited in both the print and electronic versions of the journal.

To apply, please visit https://www.stancephilosophy.com/for-reviewers-1 and follow the instructions provided on the Call for Reviewers.

Please contact us at ballstatestance@gmail.com with any questions you may have.

Deadline: October 19, 2018

Mormon Philosophy Conference

Of possible interest to some in the USU Philosophy community:

The Society for Mormon Philosophy and Theology will hold its 2018 annual meeting at USU.  Friday/ Sat March 16-17, 9-5pm.  University Inn Level 5, Rooms 507 and 510.  Theme: The Exaltation Revelations (D&C 76, 84, 88, and 93)

Click here for a full conference schedule. Talks on law, justice, open theism, human and divine nature, a critique LDS theology of gender, etc.

Congrats to some USU philosophy students!

I am pleased to note that three USU philosophy students made the Intercollegiate Studies Institute Leadership Class of 2017: Millie Tullis, Jonathon Toronto, and David Bradley Zynda.  To have 3 USU students in the class of 150 national student leaders is pretty impressive, especially when one sees the list of students and institutions (a great number of them are from Ivies, Stanford, U Chicago, and top flight private liberal arts colleges).

  For those unfamiliar with the Intercollegiate Studies Institute (ISI):  Two years ago we founded an ISI  society here at USU (the CS Lewis Society).  ISI is an outfit committed to developing principled and intellectually serious leadership.  Its primary focus is engaging students in the great books tradition along with providing them leadership training.  It has a conservative bent, but is non-partisan.  There are many notable alumni in law, politics, journalism, academia, and business, including Justices Scalia, Alito, and Gorsuch, Peter Thiel (founder of paypal), Ross Douthat (NYTimes columnist), Harvey Mansfield (well known Harvard professor), etc etc etc.
  We get funding each year to support student book clubs.  For those who struggle at USU to find intellectual life, this is just the ticket – fun, social, but intellectually serious conversations over very good books and free food.  In addition, ISI students can apply to attend regional and national conferences, which are filled with reading, lectures, and great conversation (ISI pays for everything, from flight and hotel to food and expenses, and these are typically held at pretty tony establishments).  Aside from being interesting, these conferences give students a chance to network with academic, political, and business leaders from around the country.
  If you are interested in learning more about ISI, please contact Professor Kleiner at harrison.kleiner@usu.edu.

Facticity Panel: “Truth is Complicated”

Another upcoming event of interest:

The USU Department Heads have organized a panel series called “Facticity” (the quality of being a fact).  The motivating question of the series, as I understand it, is something like ‘In an age of contested truths and alternate facts, how should we think about truth?’

The first panel is titled “Truth is Complicated” and will be held Tuesday, September 12 from 5:00-6:30pm in Eccles Conference Center Auditorium.  Panelists (all USU faculty) include our very own Charlie Huenemann, Aaron Brough, Phebe Jensen, and Courtney Flint.  Reception with some finger food after, followed by an optional discussion (moderated by our own Harrison Kleiner).